Fugler: Birds of Norway

When you move from one place to another, the big changes are evident first. Snow in winter. A new, unintelligible language. Whether cars drive down the left or right-hand side of the street. These changes are big. Adjustments are necessary. You must learn the basics all over again: how to walk, how to speak, how to live. 

Only after you adjust to the landscape and the currency of your new home do you begin to sense the other, more subtle differences:

The average height of women in Norway is a full two inches taller than the average height of women in the U.S.

Police officers walking their beats do not carry guns.

The bills of the magpies in the tree just outside our window are black, not yellow. Would anyone notice that except me?

Birds filled the skies, trees, and fields of my California childhood. Long-billed curlews dipped their curved beaks into the turf of the high school football field at dawn. Mountain blue birds fluttered into our backyard like fragments of sky. The killdeer scurried across vacant lots crying about murder. Our parents taught us to identify them all.

Now, no matter where the path I'm walking leads, I notice the birds. 

Flocks. Gaggles. Charms. Suits. Murders. Exaltations. 

We'd lived here only three months when I stopped in a bookstore and asked where I could find a book on fugler. Birds. Armed with our new full-color guide to the birds of Norway, Jonathan and I have been setting out to find and identify them. To make sense of this subtle, feathered shift in the scope of our new home.

Because I haven't been able to find a good online source of info on the Birds of Norway (or the Birds of Oslo), I thought I'd make one myself. Photos are sourced from Wikipedia. If/when I take passable photos on my own, I'll note that, as well.

The following are all the birds we've identified here in Norway. English name, Latin name, Norwegian name.

blackheaded_gull.jpg
Black-headed Gull
Larus ridibundus
Hettemåke



blue_tit.jpg
Blue Tit
Parus caeruleus
Blåmeis





canada_goose.jpg
Canada Goose
Branta canadensis
Kanadagås






carrion_crow.jpg
Carrion Crow
Corvus corone
Kråke


common_goldeneye.jpg
Common Goldeneye
Bucephala clangula
Kvinand

Note: Click on the image for a larger version.

common_raven.jpg
Common Raven
Corvus corax
Ravn




common_starling.jpg
Common Starling
Sturnus vulgaris
Stær



common_wood_pigeon.jpg
Common Wood Pigeon
Columba palumbus
Ringdue



eurasian_bullfinch.jpg
Eurasian Bullfinch
Pyrrhula pyrrhula
Dompap



eurasian_coot.jpg
Eurasian Coot
Fulica atra
Sothøne



eurasian_magpie.jpg
Eurasian Magpie
Pica pica
Skjære








eurasian_oystercatcher.jpg
Eurasian Oystercatcher
Haematopus ostralegus
Tjeld




eurasian_treecreeper.jpg
Eurasian Treecreeper
Certhia familiaris
Trekryper







european_robin.jpg
European Robin
Erithacus rubecula
Rødstrupe





great_spotted_woodpecker.jpg
Great Spotted Woodpecker
Dendrocopos major
Flaggspett









great_tit.jpg
Great Tit
Parus major
Kjøttmeis



greylag_goose.jpg
Greylag Goose
Anser anser
Grågås




mallard.jpg
Mallard
Anas platyrhynchos
Stokkand





razorbill.JPG
Razorbill
Alca torda
Alke






redbreasted_merganser.jpg
Red-breasted Merganser
Mergus serrator
Siland



rock_ptarmigan.jpg
Rock Ptarmigan
Lagopus mutus
Fjellrype



Siberian_Jay.jpg
Siberian Jay
Perisoreus infaustus
Lavskrike




Song_Thrush.jpg
Song Thrush
Turdus philomelos
Maltrost





western_jackdaw.jpg
Western Jackdaw
Corvus monedula
Kaie



willow_tit.jpg
Willow Tit
Poecile montanus
Granmeis



More to come as we continue staring at the sky.

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This page contains a single entry by Audrey Camp published on April 14, 2012 6:39 PM.

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